Beth Golay

Say As I Do: Marie Lu

Say As I Do: Marie Lu

I recently spoke with Marie Lu about her new release–Wildcard–for KMUW’s Marginalia podcast. I’m sure you probably already know how to pronounce it. But sometimes it’s nice do hear the voice, don’t you think?

Here she is:

 

Review (Plus): ‘Everything & Everywhere’

Books, for me, have always been a conduit to travel, whether real or imagined. When travel, real or imagined, also inspires creativity, it’s a win-win-win. Everything & Everywhere: A Fact-Filled Adventure for Curious Globe-Trotters by Marc Martin checks all of the boxes for me: a book about travel by an artist.

A note from the author in the opening pages explains the book’s premise: “The following pages are a gathering of facts, thoughts, and observations about our planet as seen through the eyes of an artist.” When I read the words “through the eyes of an artist” I became excited for budding artists about to discover these wonder-filled pages. I loved that the pages looked more like a travel journal than an atlas. And I love that the author/artist chose to illustrate what he found interesting, rather that what might be expected of him. And he did so with humor. One description in particular made me smile: “Reykjavik: The capital of Iceland and home to many natural wonders and strange sauces.”

At 10.3″ x 13.8″,  Everything & Everywhere is probably best labeled an oversized picture book. But there’s something about an oversized book in a tiny lap that makes the world seem even larger, don’t you think?

Judging by the amount of time I spent poring over the pages in the book, I can only imagine how many hours will be spent perusing and pondering by younger readers. (It’s categorized as a book for ages 5-8, or grades K-3, but I personally stopped letting these labels shame me a long time ago. And the labels shouldn’t stop you from spending some time with it, either!) Whether in the home or in the classroom, I envision many companion elements, like blank notebooks, pens, watercolors. But curriculum science isn’t my specialty, so here are some ‘in the classroom’ suggestions from America Grelinger. [link to come]

In the meantime, happy travels!


Everything & Everywhere: A Fact-Filled Adventure for Curious Globe-Trotters by Marc Martin (Chronicle Books | 9781452165141 | October 9, 2018)

300 Seconds: Brain Dump

I was on a commuter train recently, heading to a Chicago suburb for drinks with friends. As I settled into my book, a young woman took the seat beside me. It was the 5 o’clock express train, and she was one of the many business professionals heading home at the end of the day. She took out a notebook, sighed a couple of times, and started writing. The heading on the page read, “July 12, 2018: Brain Dump.”

Now, I admit that I’m a curious over-the-shoulder-reader. (And if you are the guy who felt ogled at the Kansas City airport, I truly just wanted to see which Paul Auster book you were reading.) But this time my over-the-shoulder-glances didn’t register any content. I was too wrapped up in the idea of a “brain dump”—freeing items, thoughts, tasks, etc. from the mind by moving it to paper.

Think about it. The best time to remember anything is when it’s fresh in your mind and before you’ve moved on to something else, and for me that something else could be as mundane as, “Where did I park my car?”

On the train, as my seat mate penned her list, the sighs became fewer. I don’t know if she later used that list to create a plan of attack, but I know that’s what I’d do. Since I use TeuxDeux, my brain dump becomes to-do items, assigned to a specific day according to deadline or realistic expectations. (I don’t like lofty to-do items that follow me, unfinished, day to day. They become dead weight.)

So before you walk out of the store today, take 300 seconds to try your own brain dump. Remembering to share The New Yorker’s adaptation of Knausgaard’s “The Trouble With Dogs for a Writer” with the proven fans in your database might mean more sales of Summer this week.

And now that that’s out of my brain, I can search for my car.

Wanna Launch a Podcast?

You might recall that I was part of a team invited to be a part of NPR’s StoryLab a couple of months ago. The podcast we worked on is almost to its launching stage, as is another one I’ve been working on for about a year. Since I seem to have some breathing room–and because I am a fool–I decided to take an online course on podcasts from the Knight Center at the University of Austin at Texas.

My instructor emailed me yesterday and encouraged me to spread the word that it’s not too late to sign up for this free course. (This sounds like it was a personal message from my instructor. No, this is a MOOC: massive open online course. There are more than 2000 participants. But the sentiment felt personal.)

I’ve noticed an uptick in bookstore podcasting lately, so if your store has tossed the idea around, you might want to sign up for this free 5-week online course. It’s called “Listen up! How to Launch and Grow a Hit Podcast” and it runs from August 20 – September 23.

Maybe we can start a study group.

Say As I Do: Kate Christensen

Say As I Do: Kate Christensen

I recently spoke with Kate Christensen about her new release–The Last Cruise–for KMUW’s Marginalia podcast. I thought I knew how to pronounce her name. Wow, was I ever wrong!

Here she is: