Beth Golay

The Struggle is Real

Here’s a cute little video from Penguin Random House titled, “The Struggles of Reading in an Apartment.” Whether it’s reading in an apartment, a house, an office, or a coffee shop–I think we can agree that sometimes the struggle is real.

If you’d like to share the video with your readers, you can find it here: https://youtu.be/wpt1J6I3NZU

Mid-Year Goal Audit

How is it already July?

Okay, I’m going to halt the direction I was initially heading and take my own advice. Instead of adopting a “glass half empty” attitude, I’m going to say to myself, “I still have 6 months to accomplish my 2018 goals.”

What’s on your list of goals for the year that you want to tackle? The beginning of the fiscal year, for some, is a good time to look at financial goals, but this mid-year check-in could also audit marketing goals, reading goals, goals for your own personal health, and so much more.

Mid-year is a great time to schedule employee performance reviews, especially if you ask for a list of goals at the beginning of the year.

And this is a great time to reach out to customers through the store newsletter or social media to check on their reading goals. Ask for feedback on any challenges in which they might be participating. Offer category suggestions. Ask about a favorite read so far this year. And perhaps offer a look at the books you’re anticipating the most for the second half of the year. If this last idea seems daunting, spread the wealth a bit and solicit ideas from your staff. That way you’ll get a variety of reading preferences to better mesh with customer preferences.

With a goal list check-in, it’s easy to focus on what remains on the list. But it’s also beneficial to look back at everything you have accomplished. How many events did you put on? How many newsletters did you write? How many recommendation cards did you display?

We have six more months of 2018! Promising, isn’t it?

Say As I Do: Rebecca Makkai

Say As I Do: Rebecca Makkai

Rebecca Makkai’s The Great Believers will be hitting shelves today. I recently spoke with Makkai for KMUW’s Marginalia podcast. If you’ve ever wondered how she pronounces her name, here she is:

 

This seems like a good time…

I’m sure you’ve noticed that Books & Whatnot emails have been arriving in your inbox less frequently. I thought I should explain.

About 6 months after I launched Books & Whatnot in 2014, I took a job at my local NPR member station. I was able to send Books & Whatnot daily for a few years, until I couldn’t. What started as the ‘digital content creator’ position has evolved into a ‘director of marketing and digital content’ position, and I also work on 3 podcast teams as either creator, editor, producer or host. Now I’ve been asked to join a podcast team at NPR’s StoryLab workshop for a project on the forthcoming gubernatorial race in my home state of Kansas, a state which, politically, at least, has been known to be its own worst enemy.

This seems like a good time to reformat Books & Whatnot.

We’ll keep posting reviews, 300-second suggestions, display images, and other noteworthy content to the website in a timely manner, but you’ll only receive a weekly round-up in your inbox. Hopefully this new format will be less daunting . . . for both of us!

Thanks for your continued support.

Beth

Review (Plus): ‘I Sleep In a Big Bed’

Ms. America’s Review:

I have found there are three mega times of transition in my children’s lives—becoming a ‘kid’ from a toddler, entering middle school (hormones, name-brands, pressure) and the junior year of high school (leaving the nest, learning to drive, college apps and what am I going to do with my life?). Now, I haven’t found a series of books for the last two, but Maria van Lieshout has offered help with the first transitional period—BIG*KID Power books. Her fourth book in this series comes out in March, I Sleep in a Big Bed.

As with her other books in this series, this little book offers relatable pictures for children to see themselves as a baby transitioning to a toddler. One of my favorite aspects in these books is the read-aloud quality van Lieshout offers. Her use of onomatopoeia is super fun! I love making the noises and making the youngster giggle as I read!

There are so many nights of parenting when we just WANT THEM TO SLEEP IN THEIR OWN BEDS! This book helps a parent with a teachable moment during the day without frustration or anger as they are often sleep deprived when the little one insists on sleeping with the parent, or comes crawling in to the parent bed in the middle of the night. It is often easier to let the child crawl into bed with them. But this book provides the idea of a lovey for their comfort verse the parent. This is also a book that can be read multiple times and used as an example throughout the days, months or years when your little one needs/insists/begs to be in your bed.

Vibrant pictures, fun sounds, and an easy to understand message is presented. The use of black and blue colors also helps give the book a ‘night time’ feel. The darkness of night is scary for little people, but with a lovey and some reassurance, a big kid can learn to sleep by themselves.

In the classroom:

Usually I offer a guide to an assignment or a lesson plan idea. This book should be used in the home instead of the classroom. It is a personal parenting decision whether you want your little person to co-sleep with you. If you are ready for the little person to sleep on their own and have tried every tactic you can think of, I highly recommend a lovey and this book. If you are having issues with potty training, binky addictions or awful tantrums there are BIG*KID Power books for these life issues, too.


I Sleep in a Big Bed by Maria van Lieshout (Chronicle Books | 9781452162904 | March 13, 2018)